26 April, 2007

Magnifique!


We just got in the Pelissier 2000 hubs and they are, in a word, magnifique! The absolute top of the line hub from the most respected French hub manufacturer, except for Maxi-Car. But a NOS set of Maxi-cars costs over $500. These 2000 hubs use sealed bearings, are polished and anodized to a near mirror shine, have the special light P2000 QR skewers. In short they are: magnifique! 125mm rear spacing for 6-spd British thread freewheels.

We also have a small quantity of NOS Ideale 2004 Randonnuese saddles A semi-modern saddle in soft suede from the great French saddle maker Ideale. Plastic base and steel rails. Rislan. Mousse de Latex (15mm).Cuir extra. Qualite artisinale!

My favorite bottom bracket is the Stronglight 700-A Monobloc, a sealed bearing and long lasting unit that's perfect for TA cranks. It's an unusual design that screws only into the drive side, but allows for chainline adjustment, a bit like the Edco. Highly recommended, but we only have a few.

For those of you who think we don't carry enough modern components we have the Sugino XD track crank. This is the track version of the venerable Sugino XD crank. What's special about our version is that it has the old style logo and is highly polished, not matt finished like most. It comes with a 46t, 3/32 chainring.

We also have a few Pake fixie cranks. It's your basic Taiwanese crank set up with a 46t 3/32 chainring. Great for city bikes and beaters. Definitely not NJS approved, but nice and shiny. Wadda ya want for $52.

The Paul Neo Retro canti brakes and bolt-on Racer centerpull brakes in the special highly polished finish have also arrived. We might be the only shop to have those.

The Simplex chainguards and gold Belleri handlebars seem to have been delayed a couple of days, but they have been shipped and are en route.

We'll put some very nice Japanese Bottom Brackets and a few other items in the store over the next few days. Now, back to opening boxes...

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

Beautiful hubs! Can you tell us, are the countersunk spoke holes intended to accept the head or the elbow bend of the spoke? A recent thread over on rec.bicycles.tech discussed this. It was claimed that the elbow bend goes there. Are there any instructions from the manufacturer?

Chris Kulczycki said...

I always assumed it was the head, but now that you mention it I'm not certain. Maybe Chris L. will chime in on this.

johnson said...

chris, perhaps something to consider:
having phil wood make thier touring hubs w/ the same flange cut outs the 'lightened' track hubs have. that would net a higher flanged hub, with a super strong rear axel, at a price barely above those french hubs. Also, you would get phil's bearings, which arnt anything super special, but he changes them out for cheap when you do wear them out. just a though.

david_nj said...

The countersunk hole is intended to hold the elbow. HTH

Anonymous said...

I think the countersunk hole is for the head, the elbow will make it's own slot under tension. Think about it, the underside of the head of a spoke is not flat so if it is run through the hub with the head on the non-countersunk side, the spoke head will stick-out. This part is critical to be full seated and supported. The elbow will make it's own seat as we have all noticed on a hub that has been previously laced...nick
www.countrybicycle.com

david_nj said...

Anonyme,

That's exactly right, but think about it, the head is "full seated and supported" on the flat side. The head isn't a countersunk shape. It's flat on the underside.

Anyhow, just ask a wheel builder you trust, or take a look at a decent set of wheels.

austex said...

What's the BCD on the Sugino track crank?

neil berg said...

Mine are countersunk on he elbow side, but they were all built by the same guy or his disciples, so it may be local.

Chris Kulczycki said...

The BCD on both the Sugino and Pake cranks is 130.

Anonymous said...

this is an interesting thread about the shape of spoke heads!!
again, I beg to differ, but the underside of a spoke head is not flat. I have a DT in my hand now. It has a distinct countersunk shape under the head where the head blends into the spoke shaft/elbow. I suspect that WS and PH spoke heads share the same profile although all I can get my hands on now is this DT...
nick at www.countrybicycle.com

JoelMatthews said...

Looking at those hubs gives rise to a minor moral quandry.

Currently I have an abundance of bikes, non of which are right for the hubs.

I don't need the hubs. But they are beautiful and I want the hubs. Is it wrong to buy a pair knowing they will likely spend the rest of my days in my display case?

Beautiful as they are, I am certain they ride as beautifully. Perhaps my heirs will have a practical use for them?

C said...

I've always been told the head goes in the countersunk hole. This allows the elbow to stick out a hair farther so it doesn't cut into the flange. That said, so long as you're using good quality parts and good technique I doubt it will have any real impact.

Alan said...

"Currently I have an abundance of bikes, non of which are right for the hubs."

Clearly you are short one bike.

Anonymous said...

Just curious
but when building with these hubs would you leave the decal on, or would that be like leaving a tag on the arm of your suit. If left on I would asume it would soon be quite weathered. I would likely remove the decal, however would decrease the mistique. Also do have matching IRD freewheels in stock

neil berg said...

vpkqy
High end items have more Ebay value with the labels on them. Personally I think it's like Minnie Pearl's price tag hanging from her hat, and generally remove the labels.

Joel said...

Alan: Well, Bruce Gordon still has the lovel 1980's show frame for sale. Imagine those hubs, a lovely CLB brake set, Sugino crank and some MKS pedals on that white frame. Wow.